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SyceYoko
Orange Dot

South Africa
514 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2009 :  6:03:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like someone was slacking on their job on patrolling the area.

http://www.streetleadersrus.blogspot.com

IMPOSSIBLE IS A FORM OF WEAKNESS

1258
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  12:22:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
CHICAGO (AP) — Message to the vandals who scratched graffiti on Chicago's stainless steel sculpture known as "The Bean": The mayor wants you to pay for the repair.

Mayor Richard KING CAPONE said Tuesday he hopes the culprits are identified so they can pay up.

Police are going over images from a Millennium Park security camera to see if they can figure out who scratched the 110-ton sculpture.

Park spokeswoman Jill Hurwitz says the damage is minimal. The company that originally polished the sculpture will buff out the unwanted marks.

The graffiti is about three feet off the ground and appears to read "Peter S" and "Ashley D." A security officer spotted it Monday afternoon.

The sculpture by artist Anish Kapoor (ah-NEESH' kah-POOR') is titled "Cloud Gate."

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  12:25:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GATZ

damn i thak daz sum grimy stuffs i wudnt touch the bean daz sum1 elses art y fuk it up




WHEN THE ARTIST DOESNT EVEN LIVE IN THE CITY AND WALKED AWAY WITH A COOL 10 MILLION OF TAX DOLLARS FOR A BEAN ALL HANDS ON DECK!!!!


It was bound to happen espcially the way they treat the skaters and the average person who peddles thru there. I dont need no mall cop telling me i cant ride my bike on a over paid peice of crap. !!!!









http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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GATZ
Blue Dot

USA
703 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  12:39:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit GATZ's Homepage  Reply with Quote
ooooooo lol wel wen u put it lik dat den double hockey stick yea go nuts but yea i dun rly hang around da bean much so yea i dun rly no much bout it lol wish i cud mak $10million 4 a big shiny bean

GATZ TIC
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SMK
Gold Dot

USA
50 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  08:04:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
stimulate this anish kapoor nutsack, 10 million dollars for what? picasso made that one sculpture and chicago tried to pay him $100,000. he declined and said he was donating it to the people of chicago. where has all the love gone?
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gonerface
Orange Dot

Albania
658 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  08:39:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit gonerface's Homepage  Reply with Quote
To b honest I'm suprised it went this long without getting hit up..let alone not even a writer..props to "ashley d" and "peter s"

Just sand it off and polish to get the shine back..


The Real
Culture & More..

www.thereal312.blogspot.com
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SHAMECTAONE
Grey Outline

USA
349 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  09:21:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
YEAH MR AZZKRACK KING CAPONE MAKE SURE U SEND YOUR POLICE FORCE TO APPREHEND THE CRIMINALS WHEN THEY CANT EVEN STOP A KID FROM PRETENDING TO BE ONE OF THEM MORE WASTE OF MONEY INSTEAD OF FIXING THE ECONOMY OF CHICAGO LET ADD ON TO THE BILL AND RAISE THE TAXES TO PAY IT.....

CREATIVE TEAM ARTIST
TILL CHICAGOS KILLED
KILLN TOYS STYLES
CAGUAS CHAPTER
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SyceYoko
Orange Dot

South Africa
514 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  10:37:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This city is starting to fall down the drain with bullshyt...

http://www.streetleadersrus.blogspot.com

IMPOSSIBLE IS A FORM OF WEAKNESS

1258
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SyceYoko
Orange Dot

South Africa
514 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2009 :  9:53:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Boston- A street artist famous for his red, wht, blu "Hope" posters for the President Obama has been arrested on warrants accusing him for tagging property with graffiti, police said sahis little brown one. ay.

http://www.streetleadersrus.blogspot.com

IMPOSSIBLE IS A FORM OF WEAKNESS

1258

Edited by - SyceYoko on 02/07/2009 10:04:30 PM
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gonerface
Orange Dot

Albania
658 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2009 :  10:21:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit gonerface's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yeah shepard fairy...he's the guy that does the "obey" campaign...

Does any one have flicks of his wheat paste posters thhat were right by the hollinder? Like last winter..


I'm pretty sure theres a more "in depth" report about this..

The Real
Culture & More..

www.thereal312.blogspot.com
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1mic
Orange Dot

USA
523 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2009 :  10:47:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
yes yes..Chicago is the dump think about it..theses basterds are worried about some bullMOHOAN by some bullMOHOAN artist...i mean yea it looks nice but me and my guys cant even stand around the spot without being to stop...wtf am i admiring?
and with the world supposedly ending in 2012...we dont have much..the hill only gets steeper

let em know nak...
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2009 :  12:47:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Creator of iconic Obama portrait arrested

BOSTON (Reuters) - An artist who created an iconic red, white and blue portrait of President Barack Obama that appeared on thousands of posters and T-shirts was arrested in Boston on graffiti charges, police said on Sahis little brown one. ay.

Shepard Fairey, a Los Angeles artist whose "Hope" image of Obama hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, was arrested on Friday night while traveling to the Institute of Contemporary Art to kickoff his first solo exhibition.

Police accuse Fairey of damaging property with graffiti in several locations and issued warrants for his arrest on January 24, Boston police spokesman James Kenneally said.

An arraignment is scheduled on Monday. If convicted on all charges, he faces up to three years in jail, Kenneally said.

Fairey made headlines this week when The Associated Press claimed his Obama portrait infringed on its copyright to a photograph used for the artwork and that it should be compensated for its use.

Fairey has acknowledged that his image was based on an April 2006 Associated Press photograph of Obama.

Fairey was to appear as a guest disc jockey at a museum event on Friday to launch the 20-year retrospective of his artwork. He spent the past two weeks in Boston installing the exhibit, giving public talks and creating outdoor art including a banner on the side of City Hall, according to a museum statement.

The museum said Fairey was arrested "in connection with his efforts posting his art in various areas around the city."

"We believe Shepard Fairey has made an important contribution in the history of art and to popular thinking about art and its role in society," the statement said.

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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gonerface
Orange Dot

Albania
658 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2009 :  1:07:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit gonerface's Homepage  Reply with Quote
thank you flash...
His work is unique hands down..
I remeber almost crashing wen a peeped the huuuge ass posters covering the 3 display windoes under that yuppy store under the hollender..

I can't belive I didn't flick it..

The Real
Culture & More..

www.thereal312.blogspot.com
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9NINE9
Orange Dot

508 Posts

Posted - 03/15/2009 :  6:20:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Published March 13, 2009 - 5:19 PM
281 Reads | Post a comment

Invisible except to Blue Line passengers, a light blue “JOEY” scrawled between white angel wings once covered the rooftop of the Mega Mall in Logan Square. That was 1983, when the O/As, the Stylers, the Disciples and other gangs hung on every street corner.

Joey, a gang member of the Spanish Lords, died in the spring of 1983. He ran into an alley where a gang member was waiting with a shotgun.

He died defending his gang’s turf.

“By 17 I had gone to seven or eight funerals, and I was just like, ‘Wow, is this my future?’” says Flash, who is now 40, and was one of the first to paint in the streets of Chicago. Faced with the opportunity to join a gang in his teens, he chose graffiti. “At that age I was thinking, ‘When is it my turn?’ That’s why I gravitated toward graffiti so much. There isn’t death in it. You don’t pay dues to anyone. You just paint.”

The gang graffiti that dominated the ‘70s gave way to the bold and colorful artwork of graffiti crews. One of the first crews survives today as the Artistic Bombing Crew (ABC), which was founded by Seen and his then-neighbor, BboyB.

“JOEY” was the second and last of the crew’s “gang banger walls,” memorializing gang banger friends killed by members of an opposing gang. A few weeks earlier, “GEORGIE,” another gang banger friend, inspired the first. After a drug deal, his friends heard that Georgie had been rolled in a rug and sent through a garbage disposal. Georgie’s cousin and fellow gang member since age 14, Lemonhead Lewy, left the gang when he learned of his cousin’s death.

“After he was murdered, I went back to the neighborhood to tell them I was done,” says Lewy, now 43. “When you quit, they want to do damage to you or kill you, so I was in hiding for five years.”

But before he left, he paid for some paint and asked his friends in the ABC for a favor. A brick wall was chosen for the first gang banger wall, in orange and brown on a white cloud. Lewy also paid for the paint for “JOEY” before skipping town.

“I was part of ABC and we just did that. We didn’t know them personally,” says Scorpio, one of three who painted the Mega Mall roof. “If you know somebody and you want him to rest in peace, I’ll paint for you. If you have a wall and permission, we’ll do it.”

But the real start of Chicago graffiti came before the gang banger walls, when Angel Perez defected from his gang in Chicago, took a bullet in the knee and left for New York City. Returning in 1979, he called himself “Seen” and introduced a host of ideas for art in the Chicago streets, even painting gang banger walls for Joey and Georgie a few years later.

The impact graffiti had on Chicagoans was unprecedented. “There was nothing better than seeing their faces the morning after fresh paint went up,” says Flash. “Painting [their] names—that just propelled us.”

Since then, the graffiti scene has expanded from the few writers in the ‘80s to include everyone, from middle school-age kids to middle-aged graphic designers. Flash is a mechanical engineer and Tsel attended Columbia College and is opening his own art gallery. Rude, another of the first graffiti artists, has been painting with his 10-year-old son for five years.

As the original, “Old School” Chicago artists are nearing 40, new generations are emerging and styles are blending. Erex, a 17-year-old writer from the western side of the city, is part of a new generation of high school-age graffiti artists. Where the Old School style used by ABC and older artists is prized for its skilled lettering, the newer, “Wild Style,” like Erex’s, emphasizes color and technique over legibility.

Though some writers, like Risk and Trane, use tie-dye colors and peace signs to support the anti-war movement, graffiti wars happen once every year or two. But unlike gang warfare, injuries rarely occur. These are wars of talent. Writers talk to each other on online Internet forums, such as MSN.com and ABC’s web site, posting photos of others’ work and complimenting each other.

Wars concerning piecework, or elaborate artwork that consumes an entire wall, seldom happen because writers honor others’ time and taste. The unspoken rule: if you paint over another writer’s work, what you produce must be better than what you covered.

“With the gangs you’re out there protecting your neighborhood and retaliating against other crews,” says Lewy. “But the graffiti guys were out there to do their artistic talent, to do pieces. Graffiti crews would retaliate just by drawing. They wouldn’t fight hand in hand; they would fight by doing better painting.”

More common than piecework wars are tagging wars, which happen once every year or two when a member of one crew has a personal issue with a member of another. Almost every graffiti artist begins his or her career as a tagger, or someone who writes his or her name on store windows, telephone booths, train cars and other visible public places. The easiest way to get attention from an experienced graffiti artist, or an invitation to join a crew, is by “bombing” the city, or tagging as much as possible in one night.

Friends often join different crews (though reluctantly), creating a web of all generations and races. This network of graffiti artists is considered one of the “four elements” that have defined hip hop culture since the early ‘80s, along with rappers, break dancers and DJs. Much cross-over exists between the elements, and many rappers started out as graffiti artists. BboyB break dances and paints.

Though Graffiti artists’ first goals were to differentiate themselves from gangs, crews borrowed ideas from gangs to identify themselves as writers. In wearing jean jackets with graffiti on the back panel, they mimicked the sweaters worn by gang members with gang colors and logos. Chicago writers also adopted gang members’ habits of crossing out and rewriting a disliked person’s name upside-down on a wall or window—which never happened in New York City’s and others’ graffiti movements.

“This was our environment,” says BboyB, who co-founded ABC with Seen. “We tried to separate ourselves from the gangs, but you end up doing the same things. It’s now become a part of Chicago culture.”

But unlike gangs, crews never used graffiti to mark imaginary boundaries or create territories. Graffiti is a culture that creates art with a purpose.

“Graffiti is letter forms. It’s an art,” says BboyB. “It’s about a word. A letter. An identity. It comes from a name, or something that’s attached to a person. It makes you famous without having the fame.”

While graffiti artists color Chicago, city officials coat every effort in “dooky brown” — Tsel’s name for the tan color sprayed by the city’s 14 Graffiti Blaster paint trucks to erase writers’ work. Less often, Mayor KING CAPONE’s Graffiti Blaster program, begun in 1993, will use one of the 13 “blast” trucks to wipe off paint with baking soda under high water pressure.

“I can spend 16 hours over two days in a weekend, and in 12 seconds I can watch that machine cover everything in brown,” Flash says. “But then it becomes just another canvas and it’s easy to put something new on it.”

In addition to the dooky brown punishment, Chicago charges writers with a felony and the highest fines in the nation for illegal work – up to $1,000 and jail time for a repeat offender. Because piecework is almost always done on permission walls, only tagging, which is done on public property, creates a legal problem. Because tagging is only necessary for a beginner to be noticed, many established artists, who now have families, less free time, and more to lose from getting caught, are tagging less and spending more time with “permission walls.”

“I’ll watch a wall for a couple of months, see it painted over a few times in dooky brown, and then ask the owner of the store, ‘How would you like to not have to tell the city each time the gangs come?’ and I show my portfolio,” says Flash. His job in ABC for the last five years has been scouting for permission walls this way.

Once a crew has permission, as many as 15 writers contribute, adding their own names and illustrations to the wall. Each “production” has a general theme, such as a cave with stalactites, that each writer paints around or incorporates. After a couple weeks, the writers will return, let the building owner know they are part of the crew with permission, and cover the wall with a fresh layer of artwork.

The style is constantly evolving, from the gang influences of the Old School technique, which emphasizes legibility, to the European and Wild Style techniques, which take pride in their illegibility and letter shapes.

The Mega Mall roof has since been coated in a fresh layer of tar, but “JOEY” has already infected generations with the love for graffiti culture. The reasons for graffiti writing never changed; it is a source of talent, respect and camaraderie without dues, guns, punishment or initiation rituals. It provides a skill and an alternative to gang life.

“In many ways, graffiti saves people’s lives,” says Tsel, who has been featured in and is now opening an art gallery. “It saves you from whatever you could have done. I could be doing 50 years in prison for something, but painting gave me an opportunity to be an artist. It gave me something in my life that was positive.”
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BLIS
Gold Dot

64 Posts

Posted - 03/16/2009 :  8:57:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Highway signs defaced on I-90/94

http://www.suntimes.com/news/24-7/1479057,eisenhower-expressway-tagging-031609.article



PEACE!!!!
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tselone
Moderator

Netherlands
4271 Posts

Posted - 03/19/2009 :  6:39:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit tselone's Homepage  Reply with Quote
NO DUMMB AZZ SHOULD BE TAGGING "OOPS"...There is only one OOPS...An U aint it!!!!

tselone

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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2009 :  12:49:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Logan Square activists who are frustrated with graffiti at a new skate park say it illustrates how taggers are outmaneuvering officialdom.

Their arsenal has expanded from spray paint to glass-etching acids and clusters of stickers that are a public nuisance, said Larry Ligas of Logan Square Concerned Citizens.

"It's gotten brutal," said Concerned Citizens co-founder, Joe Pagan.

And some taggers aren't just aimlessly defacing property. Some are promoting a cause.

For example, when LSCC members visited the yet-to-open park Sahis little brown one. ay, Ligas said they found it decorated with stickers promoting T-shirts, a DJ and an April 25 socialism conference. Some youths were using markers to tag skateboard ramps, he said.

One admitted he was carrying a container of a glass-etching acid that can be found at art and hobby shops, Ligas said.

The park, on Logan Boulevard under the Kennedy Expy., is supposed to be for neighborhood skate boarders but is becoming a magnet for vandalism-prone outsiders, according to Ligas and Pagan.

They said the taggers they confronted Sahis little brown one. ay weren't from Logan Square. The youths told them they were from a Chicago arts school, other parts of the city, and the suburbs.

"They're defacing our community," Ligas said.

Acid-etching vandals have kept Randy Smith busy. He sells a security film that prevents the damage. He has seen pockets of etched windows in Logan Square, Wicker Park and downtown.

"Columbia College is one of my big clients,'' said Smith, of R.A.D. Window Technology. "They've had a big problem."

Farther north, a police officer said some Albany Park streets have been dotted with stickers for the socialism conference.

It doesn't matter if they're placed on public property like light poles, the officer said: "When you put these stickers up, you are graffiti-ing the city."

John Beacham, an organizer of the event, said he wasn't aware of where the stickers were placed.

But he said the city has "draconian" laws on posting bills, selective enforcement, and, "It's not a public safety issue."


http://www.suntimes.com/sports/olympics/1501947,CST-NWS-skate30.article


They should have never built the skate park without understanding the culture.

Every skatepark in America has graffitti on it. I have talked with the LOGAN SQUARE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION and the alderman. They knew this would happened. I can paint murals on the south side but i cant get people in my own community to work with me on something positive for these kids to do. So this is what you get when you come into a neighborhood and do not work with the people that live there.


FLASH ABC

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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gonerface
Orange Dot

Albania
658 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2009 :  1:31:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit gonerface's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hmm...intresting.

The Real
Culture & More..

www.thereal312.blogspot.com
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AMPOEROK
Gold Dot

Ethiopia
111 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2009 :  2:18:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit AMPOEROK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
rite on the dot.correct



quote:
Originally posted by FLASH ABC

Logan Square activists who are frustrated with graffiti at a new skate park say it illustrates how taggers are outmaneuvering officialdom.

Their arsenal has expanded from spray paint to glass-etching acids and clusters of stickers that are a public nuisance, said Larry Ligas of Logan Square Concerned Citizens.

"It's gotten brutal," said Concerned Citizens co-founder, Joe Pagan.

And some taggers aren't just aimlessly defacing property. Some are promoting a cause.

For example, when LSCC members visited the yet-to-open park Sahis little brown one. ay, Ligas said they found it decorated with stickers promoting T-shirts, a DJ and an April 25 socialism conference. Some youths were using markers to tag skateboard ramps, he said.

One admitted he was carrying a container of a glass-etching acid that can be found at art and hobby shops, Ligas said.

The park, on Logan Boulevard under the Kennedy Expy., is supposed to be for neighborhood skate boarders but is becoming a magnet for vandalism-prone outsiders, according to Ligas and Pagan.

They said the taggers they confronted Sahis little brown one. ay weren't from Logan Square. The youths told them they were from a Chicago arts school, other parts of the city, and the suburbs.

"They're defacing our community," Ligas said.

Acid-etching vandals have kept Randy Smith busy. He sells a security film that prevents the damage. He has seen pockets of etched windows in Logan Square, Wicker Park and downtown.

"Columbia College is one of my big clients,'' said Smith, of R.A.D. Window Technology. "They've had a big problem."

Farther north, a police officer said some Albany Park streets have been dotted with stickers for the socialism conference.

It doesn't matter if they're placed on public property like light poles, the officer said: "When you put these stickers up, you are graffiti-ing the city."

John Beacham, an organizer of the event, said he wasn't aware of where the stickers were placed.

But he said the city has "draconian" laws on posting bills, selective enforcement, and, "It's not a public safety issue."


http://www.suntimes.com/sports/olympics/1501947,CST-NWS-skate30.article


They should have never built the skate park without understanding the culture.

Every skatepark in America has graffitti on it. I have talked with the LOGAN SQUARE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION and the alderman. They knew this would happened. I can paint murals on the south side but i cant get people in my own community to work with me on something positive for these kids to do. So this is what you get when you come into a neighborhood and do not work with the people that live there.


FLASH ABC



wcklan up around chicago.2113
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madspy
Banana Skinny

Poland
205 Posts

Posted - 03/30/2009 :  2:28:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FLASH ABC


"When you put these stickers up, you are graffiti-ing the city."





graffiti-ing huh? anyone like graffiti-ing?
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